Category Archives: incredible

Galium cf. murale, Cardiff, UK – new to Glamorgan

I collected this intriguing little Galium with minute cream / pale yellow petals while in Cardiff, Wales, UK, last week for a conference not directly related to field botany. As it was my first time in Cardiff I got up early and went for a random walk – and my eyes got stuck with this miniature plant, growing between pavement cracks at ST19167594.

I first thought of Herniaria glabra – which would have been a surprise –, then looking closer, it reminded me of Sherardia arvensis, yet the pale yellow creamy tiny petals ruled this taxon out. When I got round to look at the specimen collected more closely from the comfort of my home lab, it did not key out well in Stace (2010). Could it be something ‘new’?

As I knew I would not have an opportunity to visit an herbarium in the coming weeks or months, I resorted to the online account of Galium from Flora Iberica (Ortega Olivencia and Devesa, 2007). The specimen collected matches very well Galium murale and no other taxa from Spain or Portugal. However, the plant found in Cardiff could be originally from another region of the World than the Iberic peninsula, so there remains a certain degree of uncertainty regarding its taxonomic identity.

Going back to Stace (2010), a more thorough inspection revealed that G. murale is mentioned as an additional species, but not included in the key. He also suggests that it may be spreading – which might prove right.

A quick internet search suggests that Galium murale has been reported to Britain and Ireland several times in the past, including as a wool alien in the past. In recent years, there is a 2008 report of a large colony in Sussex in a previous issue of the BSBI News (Nicolle, 2008). Looking at the BSBI distributions maps online there are six recent sightings in southern England, Wales and Ireland (excluding the Sussex population – 02/05/2017).

How to spot Galium murale? It looks a bit like Sherardia arvensis, or Galium aparine that shrank dramatically. However, there are important general differences: the general size (G. murale is a very small plant – see picture with one penny coin for scales), the size and colour of the four petals (cream) and the number of leaves by whorl (four). Important finer characters for identification against other Galium: forward pointing bristles on the leaves, cylindric ovary/fruit only partly covered by bristles.

In Stace (2010), it keys out as Galium boreale because of the whorls of 4 leaves but this was obviously not a good match with my plant. Ignoring this and going onto couplet 3, leads one to Galium spurium, however, the description and the size of this species did not match my plant.

Happy hunting everyone – a lovely little plant to be looking for in warmer part of Britain and Ireland. Best time of the year would be early spring/spring time.

References

Ortega Olivencia, A, and Devesa Alvaraz, JA, 2007, Galium, In Devesa Alvaraz, JA (Eds), Flora Iberica, Volumen XV, Rubiaceae-Dipsacaceae, Real Jardín Botánico: Madrid.

Stace, C 2010, New Flora of the British Isles, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. Third Edition

Nicolle, D 2008. Galium murale – a foothold in Eastbourne? issue 109. BSBI News.

Filago vulgaris in the city of Sheffield

Urban flora fascinates me. One of the reasons is that the exceptional floristic diversity found in urban habitats challenges my ideas about wildlife and conservation. We tend to think of urban development as intrinsically adverse to biodiversity, however, re-colonisation can be quick and novel habitats can be rich and surprisingly biodiverse.

This positive aspect needs of course to be weighed up against irreversible loss of some habitats such as nutrient poor mires that can disappear and are never replaced.

P1030273But I also enjoy urban floras because so many unexpected plants turn up! and because it transforms my weekly trips to the supermarket into genuine botanical expeditions. Above and below are pictures of Filago vulgaris, the common cudweed, in a waste ground in (SK337889) Walkley, Sheffield, UK, near home. I had spotted the hundreds of tiny rosettes early this spring but couldn’t work out whether it would turn out to be a Filago or Gnaphalium uliginosum, the marsh cudweed.

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Ponds and aquatic plants near Catcliffe and Treeton, East of Sheffield, UK

Last August, I was fortunate to be shown several ponds near Catcliffe and Treeton, East of Sheffield, UK, by Bob Croxton, form Sorby Natural History Society. The area is full of history and is a fascinating example of nature recovering following industrialisation.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor instance, one of the ponds visited was formed in a lost piece of land amongst spoil heaps and three railway line! At this site Persicaria maculata and Nymphoides peltata were in full bloom (see picture) and two Potamogeton species were observed, now confirmed as P. pectinatus and P. pusillus. However only one shore was prospected and other nice aquatic plants are likely to be present in the rest of the pond.

On the whole, too many of the water bodies in the area were absolutely dominated by Elodea nuttallii, an invasive species that colonised the UK from the 1970s. It’s phenomenal spread in Britain and Ireland is summarised in a paper by Simpson that can be read from the BSBI archives. It remains unclear whether this spread has caused arm to aquatic biodiversity or whether it was simply facilitated by degraded habitats.

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Persicaria amphibia (amphibious bistort) in full bloom! East Sheffield, UK