Monthly Archives: August 2015

Senecio inaequidens, narrow-leaved ragwort, Kirk Sandall station, South Yorkshire, UK

I got familiar with this species on the continent, where it became very abundant but seeing it near Doncaster on the railway tracks was quite a surprise – I had not seen it for quite a while now: it was like meeting up with a good old friend!

Senecio inaequidens, the narrow-leaved ragwort, is a fast spreading plants from Southern Africa that is mainly found in ruderal situations in Europe. It’s identification is relatively easy because it has the flowers of a ragwort (well, no wonder as it is one…) but it has very narrow leaves without any lobes (see picture below) and it has a stout fibrous stem. Keep your eyes peeled as it is likely to be under-recorded!

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Transport networks such as railway and roads are often vector of spreading species. This is not only because vehicles transport seeds and other propagules but also because the transport network creates continuous novel habitats whose physical and disturbance conditions can strongly differ from the surrounding landscape.

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Cystopteris fragilis, brittle bladder-fern, Multangular Tower, York city centre, UK

Yet another interesting urban plant. I found Cystopteris fragilis, the brittle bladder-fern, thriving on old walls in the city of York. It is possible that improved air quality in the recent decades and a drastic reduction of acid rains is increasingly favouring this species and other alkaline-substrate-loving ferns such as Ceterach officinarum – rustyback – to grow on mortar in urban situations.

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